The U.C.A. now supports Motorola 6800!

Finally, two years after a Intel 8088 (almost) booted for the first time on a very early UCA, I’m glad to announce the support for the last major 8-bit CPU : the famous Motorola 6800 !

The Motorola 6800, released in 1974, was one of the most advanced CPU in the 70s. Being TTL-compatible and only requiring 5V power, it was also¬† easy to use for hobbyist (albeit a two-phase clock was mandatory). Unfortunately, its high price prevented the 6800 to reach the DIY “mainstream” market. Many computer pioneer preferred the MOS 6500 and the Intel 8080, but Motorola¬† soon released a much cheaper, MCU-revision of the 6800 – the 6809 – that has been very successful.

The architecture of the 6800 is quite simple but efficient. It uses two accumulators, a 8-bit bidirectional data bus, a 16-bit stack pointer, and a 16-bit dedicated address bus that could address 64 KB of memory. Unlike the Intel 8080, the Motorola 6800 uses memory-mapped I/O : it doesn’t include specific instructions for I/O and they are handled as standard memory accesses.

Implementing support for the 6800 on the Universal Chip Analyzer (U.C.A.) wasn’t too difficult. The dual-phase clock was the main issue, as timings are usually tighter than with single-phase clock. Another issue was the UCA adapter. I designed it to support both MOS 65xx and Motorola 68xx, but the cheap chinese ZIF Socket (3M clone) I soldered on was crappy. The contact between the adapter and the main ZIF Socket wasn’t also very good, due to the standard 2.54mm pin header. Too thick, too square. So I build another adapter with a much more efficient Socket (an ARIES low-profile, burn-in ZIF Socket) and some new pin headers that mimic a real CPU :

The new Socket with “real” CPU pins (front) VS the old one (back)

Everything worked as expected and very reliably with that new adapter! Here is the UCA testing a Motorola MC6800P at 2 MHz and a very rare prototype (Motorola XC6800B) at 1 MHz :

Testing frequency can be set at 1.0 / 1.5 / 2.0 or 3.0 MHz to match the most popular 68xx.

Support for Motorola 6801/6802/6803/6808/6809 is planned soon.

More important, a brand new era is coming for the UCA, as I can now focus on much more advanced, 32-bit CPU. Many news planned soon!